Build Your Own Website The Right Way Using HTML & CSS

Build Your Own Website The Right Way Using HTML & CSS

Language: English

Pages: 500

ISBN: 0987090852

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


With over 60,000 copies sold since its first edition, this SitePoint best-seller has just had a fresh update to include recent advances in the web industry.

With the first two editions coming highly recommended by established, leading web designers and developers, the third edition with all its extra goodies will continue that trend. Also fully updated to include the latest operating systems, web browsers and providing fixes to issues that have cropped up since the last edition.

Readers will learn to:

  • Style text and control your page layout with CSS
  • Create and Optimize graphics for the Web
  • Add interactivity to your sites with forms
  • Include a custom search, contact us page, and a News/Events section on your site
  • Track visitors with Google Analytics
  • Extend your reach and connect your site with Social Media
  • Use HTML5&CSS3 to add some cool, polished features to your site
  • Use diagnosis/debug tools to find any problems

And lots more.

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about.html. Where’s My File Extension? If your filename appears as just index in Windows Explorer, your system is cur­ rently set up to hide extensions for files that Windows recognizes. To make the extensions visible, follow these simple steps: 1. Launch Windows Explorer. 2. Vista users, select Organize > Folder and Search Options...; Windows XP users, select Tools > Folder Options... 3. Select the View tab. 4. In the Advanced Settings group, make sure that Hide extensions for known file types

cite attribute) in the diving web site, but you may find them useful in your own web site projects. strong and em We mentioned the em element earlier in this chapter. It’s a fairly straightforward element to remember. If you can imagine yourself adding some kind of inflection as you say a word, then emphasis is probably what you need. If you’re looking to strike a slightly more forceful tone, then you should consider “going in strong”. Your First Web Pages By default, adding em will style text

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Sourcing Images for Your Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Background Images in CSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Repeated Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 xiv Non-repeating Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Shorthand Backgrounds . . .

Your Classes You’ll notice here that I’ve used the class name highlight. I’ve used that name because I’m imagining a hypothetical situation where I wanted to highlight a particular paragraph within a page of content. This is good practice. The basic rule is to use names that describe the purpose or meaning of the content to which the class names are applied. It may be tempting, however, to name your classes according to how they appear visually. For instance, I could’ve used the class name

perhaps you’re already putting it through its paces—and that browser is Chrome,5 courtesy of Google. As I sit writing and updating this chapter, Chrome is the newest, freshest browser available; it’s even has that “new browser smell.” Okay, so it’s not quite the same as a new car smell! But the point is that this browser is literally just days old as I write, and currently only available for Windows XP/Vista. By the time you read this, there may also be versions available for Mac OS X and Linux

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